Tag: mindfulness

AotD: Argentine tango dance compared to mindfulness meditation and a waiting-list control

Article of the Day:

Argentine tango dance compared to mindfulness meditation and a waiting-list control:

A randomised trial for treating depression

by Pinniger, R., Brown, R.F., Thorsteinsson, E.B., & McKinley, P. (2012).

(Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 20, 377-384. DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2012.07.003)

Background & Research

Depression and anxiety problems are massive public health issues, not to mention sources of great suffering for millions of people worldwide. In addition to the current standard approach of medication and/or, more rarely, psychotherapy, a great number of somewhat more alternative treatments/forms of help have been proposed and developed for depression and anxiety. Programs or treatments that would be easy to implement, preferably in group settings, inclusive, and cost-effective garner great interest for practical reasons.

Physical activity overall has been found to significantly alleviate depressive symptoms and psychological distress. This is especially true for recreational physical activity, as opposed to specific rehabilitation exercises. Dance combines physical activity with other features found to promote mental well-being, including expressive characteristics, music and (in the case of pair/group dancing) a strong social and physical connection to another person. Not surprisingly, studies have reported dance “therapies” to be at least an effective adjunct to other forms of therapy for depression and anxiety.

Argentinian-style tango dancing in particular adds to the equation requirements for greater awareness of one’s own body and that of the partner, as well as awareness of the current experience in the here and now overall, trust in the partner, and significant skills acquisition over time. A number of physical and social benefits from tango dancing have already been demonstrated (e.g., improved balance, self-esteem, quality of life, coordination, walking speed). Further, despite its generally melancholic contents, tango music has been shown to generate positive emotions, and combined with partnered dancing to improve a person’s emotional state.

In light of these features of tango music and dancing, the study this article reports on examined the possibility that tango dancing could be employed as a mindfulness-based treatment for affective symptoms. Other more clearly mindfulness-based interventions, such as Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy, have previously been shown to reduce symptom severity in, e.g., depression and pain, in several studies. Out of particular mindfulness activities, meditation has repeatedly been found to improve psychological well-being in many ways. The authors propose that tango dancing shares attributes with such mindfulness promoting approaches, and could represent a novel form of group intervention combining elements of physical activity and mindfulness. Continue Reading…

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AotD: Mindfulness interventions for psychosis: A meta-analysis

Article of the Day:

Mindfulness interventions for psychosis: A meta-analysis

by Khoury, B., Lecomte, T., Gaudiano, B.A., & Paquin, K. (2013)

(Schizophrenia Research, 150(1). 176–184. )

Background & Research

Among the so-called Third Wave of cognitive-behavioural therapies, mindfulness-based approaches have garnered great interest in recent years, within clinical psychology as well as among the more general public. Definitions of “mindfulness” vary, but it is generally understood to refer to non-judgmental and non-reactive awareness, observation and acceptance of all inner experiences, the centering of attention and experience to the here and now, and in most cases, cultivating an attitude of kindness or (loving) compassion. In terms of interventions based on mindfulness, their unifying goal is to learn to willingly embrace and accept present experiences in the moment, both pleasant and unpleasant, without avoiding, suppressing or clinging on to them.

As regards psychosis, developing mindfulness skills could be helpful for alleviating the distress and suffering related to psychotic symptoms, instead of attempting to control them. Individuals might be able to change their ways of responding and ascribing meaning to the symptoms as they appear, regarding them as transient experiences that do not define one as a person or necessarily reflect reality. The symptoms or sensations are likely to remain unpleasant, but by promoting acceptance of them and their transient nature, individuals may reclaim power over themselves better than by attempting to fight, correct or counteract the symptoms.  Continue Reading…

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